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Wrens

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2020

   
 
     
 

It’s not the smallest British bird (that’s the goldcrest), but it is the shortest. It’s the only member of the wren family to be found outside the Americas (where there are no fewer than 83 different species of wren).

There are an estimated 7 million wren territories in Britain, making it one of our most abundant birds, although it does suffer decline during prolonged, severely cold winters.

Diet consists of, insects, beetles, and spiders, the Wren usually feeds close to ground. The song is a powerful voice for such a small bird.

They sing from the lower branches, unlike the other song-master, the Robin who will perch on high brows to display his song. In proportion to its size, the wren has the loudest song of any British bird.

The male builds several nests, each with a side entrance, and when the female has selected which one she prefers, he lines it for her to lay her eggs.

1,400 Wrens weighs the same as a male swan.

     
 
     

2021

   
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
   
     
 
     
     
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