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Canada Geese

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2020

   
 
     
 

During the second year of their lives, Canada geese find a mate. They are monogamous, and most couples stay together all of their lives. If one dies, the other may find a new mate.

The female lays from two to nine eggs with an average of five, and both parents protect the nest while the eggs incubate, but the female spends more time at the nest than the male.

The incubation period, in which the female incubates while the male remains nearby, lasts for 24–32 days after laying.

Canada geese are especially protective animals, and will sometimes attack any animal nearing its territory or offspring, including humans. Most of the species that prey on eggs also take a gosling. Although parents are hostile to unfamiliar geese, they may form groups of a number of goslings and a few adults, called crèches.

In the water, it feeds from aquatic plants by sliding its bill at the bottom of the body of water. It also feeds on aquatic plant-like algae, such as seaweeds.
 
     
     
     
 
     
 
     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

2021

January: Is this the same family that we saw last year?
     
   
     
     
 
22 February: We spotted this "albino" Canada Goose
 
 
     
     
     
 
     
     
 
     
 
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
     
 
     
 
     
     
 
     
   
     
 
     
 
     
 
     
     
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