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Toulouse Geese

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2020

   
 
     

 

 

The Toulouse is a French breed of large domestic goose, originally from the area of Toulouse in south-western France. Two types are recognised: a heavy industrial type with dewlaps, the French: Oie de Toulouse à bavette; and a slightly lighter agricultural type without dewlaps, the French: Oie de Toulouse sans bavette. Both types are large, with weights of up to 9 kg

The original grey-coloured breed is a very old one and the name has been recorded back as far as 1555. The breed was first brought to the United Kingdom by Lord Derby in 1840, who imported some of them to England, and from then onwards the French Toulouse were used as breeding stock with the consequence that by 1894, English breeders had produced a massive bird.

The 'Toulouse' in France, although kept in greater numbers, have never quite equalled such weights. The breed was later brought to North America, where it became popular in the upper Midwest due to its ability to withstand cold winters.

Females are usually good mothers, but tend to be clumsy that easily crush eggs. These geese mate for life.

They can live 20 - 22 years; although the average lifespan is 10.

     
     
 
     
 
     
     
 
     
     
 
     
     
 
     
     
 
     
 
     
     
 
     
     
 
     
     

2021

   
   
     
     
     
   
     
   
 
   
     
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